Welcome to the conversation!


Welcome to the conversation!

Harriet Beecher Stowe's (1811-1896) best-selling anti-slavery novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852), made her the most famous American woman of the 19th century and galvanized the abolition movement before the Civil War.

The Stowe Center is a 21st-century museum and program center using Stowe's story to inspire social justice and positive change.

The Salons at Stowe programs are a forum to connect the challenging issues (race, gender and class) that impelled Stowe to write and act with the contemporary face of those same issues. The Salon format is based on a robust level of audience participation, with the explicit goal of promoting civic engagement. Recent topics included: Teaching Acceptance; Is Prison the New Slavery; Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North; Creativity and Change; Race, Gender and Politics Today; How to be an Advocate

This blog will expand the reach of these community conversations to the online audience. Add your posts and comments to keep the conversation going! Commit to action by clicking HERE to stay up to date on Salon and social justice news.

For updates on Stowe Center programs and events, sign up for our enews at http://harrietbeecherstowe.org/email.

Thursday, September 22, 2016

#SalonatStowe: Meet the Featured Guests

Join us tonight for our first Salon at Stowe of the season: Separate and Unequal: How do We Achieve Equity in Education?

Speaking on the issues, will be José A. Colón of Hartford Public High School, Robert Cotto of Trinity College and the Hartford Board of Education, and Kate Busch Gervais of the Discovery Center.



José A. Colón is a school administrator in the Hartford Public Schools.  He currently serves the as Principal of the Law and Government Academy at Hartford Public High School.  He is a native of Hartford and a proud graduate of the Hartford Public School System.  Mr. Colón received a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Development and Family Relations from the University of Connecticut, a Masters Degree in Secondary Education from Eastern Connecticut State University and a post master’s degree from Sacred Heart University in School Administration.  

Prior to his work in the Hartford School System, Mr. Colón served the Town of West Hartford as the Co-Director of the Youth Service Bureau through his work at the Bridge Family Center.  In West Hartford he worked closely with the school system and other departments in town to deliver high quality prevention and intervention programs and services to youth and teens. 

Mr. Colón is married to Ms. Vivian Luna-Colón who is also a lifelong educator and they have an amazing daughter Samantha, a senior at the Medical Professions and Teacher Preparation Academy.


Robert Cotto, Jr. is the Director of Urban Education Initiatives at Trinity College. He graduated from Dartmouth College with a degree in sociology and he has a Master’s degree in education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and from Trinity College in American Studies. Before coming to Trinity, Robert was a K-12 educational researcher and teacher. 
He believes that teaching and learning should be connected to each student’s interests, the communities related to our study, and the scholars that have come before us. He has worked with students at various levels in the Hartford area to develop their academic interests, abilities, and skills. 

His academic work focuses on K-12 education policy. His past and present research focuses on educational reform movements in the U.S. and Puerto Rico that offer educational improvement, yet often reinforce inequality or are subverted by existing social policy. In particular, he studies the history and current impact of educational testing, school choice, and teacher-led innovation, and management policies, particularly with respect to marginalized and racialized groups. 



Kate has been the Executive Director of The Discovery Center since July, 2015. The Discovery Center is a nonprofit educational social change organization works in partnership with youth, families, schools and communities to facilitate nurturing spaces where people can challenge systemic racism and oppression. Kate’s experience includes more than three decades in social justice, community engagement and entrepreneurship. 

Kate previously managed the grassroots outreach for the launch of the Affordable Care Act for Access Health Connecticut and the Office of the CT Healthcare Advocate by working with more than 250 community organizations, state agencies and individuals to reach underserved individuals and communities with services in 33 languages. More than 35,000 were enrolled through this effort, which was highlighted by the Kaiser Family Foundation, the Texas Health Institute and the Yale School of Public Health as a highly-effective, respectful program. She was Senior Program and Development Officer for Universal Health Care Foundation where she developed the Small Business Health Care Network, focused on small and businesses owned by people of color. This program engaged more than 1,000 small business owners and leaders in advocating for their needs on a statewide and national state. 

What will you ask the featured guests? Let us know in the comments below and join us tonight! 5:30 PM social half-hour, 6:00 PM discussion, all at the Stowe Center! 

   

#StoweSyllabus: What We're Reading This Week

Articles and current events that got us thinking over the week!

Another day, another hashtag: White people, you gotta get to work now
Awesomely Luvvie September 21, 2016, Awesomely Luvvie
http://www.awesomelyluvvie.com/2016/09/white-people-anti-racism.html 

It’s time to get over your feelings and take action for Black lives
Ann Friedman, August 3, 2016, New York Magazine
http://nymag.com/thecut/2016/08/showing-up-for-racial-justice-white-feelings-black-lives.html?mid=twitter_nymag  

Throwing the rock and hiding your hand: White women and a revisiting of intersectionality
Jameelah Jones, September 21, 2016, Medium
https://medium.com/@SocialJusticeJones/throwing-the-rock-and-hiding-your-hand-white-women-and-a-revisiting-of-intersectionality-5c5ac8bdf7cb#.d856u8yaj 

Why are cops OK with killing black people? Because American history teaches that we aren’t fully human
D. Watkins, September 21, 2016, Salon
http://www.salon.com/2016/09/21/why-are-cops-ok-with-killing-black-people-because-american-history-teaches-that-we-arent-fully-human/  

In conversation: Ava Duvernay
Rebecca Traister, September 2016, New York Magazine
http://nymag.com/thecut/2016/09/ava-duvernay-the-13th-queen-sugar-c-v-r.html 

What are you reading this week? Share in the comments below! 

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

#StoweSyllabus: What We're Reading This Week

Articles and current events that got us thinking over the week!

Making a home for Black History
Vinson Cunnigham, August 29, 2016, The New Yorker
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/08/29/analyzing-the-national-museum-of-african-american-history-and-culture

Nat Turner’s insurrection
Thomas Wentworth Higgins, 1861 issue of The Atlantic
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1861/08/nat-turners-insurrection/308736/

Justice Department says it will end the use of private prisons
Matt Zapotosky and Chico Harlan, August 18, 2016, The Washington Post
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2016/08/18/justice-department-says-it-will-end-use-of-private-prisons/?utm_term=.630554b428e2

Using Reconstruction to understand today’s racial tensions
Andrew Reese, July 28, 2016, Facing Today
http://bit.ly/2bOiNtC  

What are you reading this week? Share in the comments below!